Monthly Archives: March 2010

Eat Green for St. Patrick’s Day!

The world is turning green today.  Whether you are celebrating St. Patrick’s Day, the coming of spring or being friendly to the environment, you can enjoy the health benefits of asparagus.

Asparagus is low in calories, contains no cholesterol and is healthy as it is very low in sodium. It is also a good source of vitamin B6, calcium, magnesium and zinc, and a very good source of dietary fiber, protein, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K, thiamin, riboflavin, rutin, niacin, folic acid, iron, phosphorus, potassium, copper, manganese and selenium. It tastes fabulous too!

Asparagus and Fresh Mozzarella

Ingredients:

1 lb asparagus spears
2 oz fresh mozzarella cheese, cut or torn into pieces
1 tsp snipped fresh lemon verbena or 1/4 tsp. finely shredded lemon peel

Directions:

Snap off and discard woody bases from asparagus. Using a sharp knife, carefully split asparagus stalks lengthwise. Place a steamer basket in a large skillet. Add water to just below the bottom of the steamer basket. Bring water to boiling. Add asparagus to steamer basket. Cover and steam for 1 minute. Transfer asparagus to a broiler-proof serving dish; top with mozzarella cheese. Broil asparagus 4 inches from heat about 2 minutes or until cheese bubbles slightly. Just before serving, sprinkle with lemon verbena.

Makes 4 to 6 servings.

Nutrients Per Serving:
56 Calories
3 g Total Fat
2 g Saturated Fat
2 g Carbohydrates
5 g Proteins
11 mg Cholesterol
134 mg Sodium
1 g Fiber

For more great vegetable recipes, Click Here

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What Do I Eat Now?

Patti Geil and Tami Ross have teamed up to write “What Do I Eat Now? A Step-by-Step Guide to Eating Right with Type 2 Diabetes.” This handbook is a must-have for anyone wanting to be pro-active  in self-managing diabetes. A diabetes diagnosis can be overwhelming but with the right tools, it doesn’t have to be. Truth be told, the dietary advice dispensed in this book makes sense for just about anyone wanting to be healthier.

Chapters start with the basic “Nutrition and Diabetes 101” and continue through “What is Carbohydrate and Why Does it Matter?”, “Savvy Snacking”, “Special Occasions” and a wealth of practical instruction. The authors have a distinctly positive approach and encourage one to focus on what you can eat rather than what you can’t have.

Written in a layman’s language, this book is well-researched and well-presented. Both authors have an impressive record of teaching others to triumph over what can be a debilitating disease.

Health is truly wealth, and this book is one you can’t afford to not have.